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Dave Canterbury Lecture

Discussion in 'Training, Classes & Education' started by JDOUTDOORS, Oct 22, 2016.

  1. JDOUTDOORS

    JDOUTDOORS Well-Known Member

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    I found this video of a lecture Dave Canterbury gave at an Expo. There is a lot of great information on being prepared, what to prep, what mindset you should have to be able to survive.



    Thinking of the long term is definitely the way to go when prepping.


    What do you think of this mindset and skill set?
     
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  2. livingsurvival

    livingsurvival Administrator
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    I watched this a while back. It is a great talk.
     
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  3. AJ ESCUDERO

    AJ ESCUDERO Well-Known Member
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    Same here. I liked how he touched on traps lasting longer than snares.
     
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  4. JDOUTDOORS

    JDOUTDOORS Well-Known Member

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    I didn't think about traps lasting longer than snares until I watched the seminar, but it really does make sense. Especially, since they've been here for so long and are still being used today.
     
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  5. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    Traps vs snares, not to disagree with an expert, but if I'm using snares I expect them to break or wear out.

    I'm also not setting snares to just get small game and predators. I'm looking at setting the snares higher and attaching them to a drag. I snare a 1# rabbit, I feed me, not even the family.
    I snare a deer, that's something different.

    Swivels and proper lock stops on snares make a heck of a difference.

    I enjoy Dave's longhunter concepts, but in many respects, he's taken a step too far into the primitive, and has localized himself in some ways. The muzzle loading scattergun may be great in Ohio and West Virginia, but out in the sticks and mountains, I will eat better with a simple .22.
     
  6. schizm

    schizm Banned Member

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    there is no reason to limit yourself to the .22lr. Get a .22lr pistol and an sks, so that you'll have reasonably priced rapidfire and 30-30 range on big game. Me, I go with a suppressed M4, with a Ciener .22lr conversion unit. Ciener has a .22 unit for the Ak, and some oufit sells a single shot .32 ACP conversion or 30 carbine, 308, 3006. The scattergun is a silly idea, the single shot is worse and the muzzleloader worst of all. where you gonna get sulpur, eh? it's very, very dangerous to 'corn" black powder. google a site called "cast boolits" forums. even very light charges for 12 ga is 20 to the lb. 22's are 135 to the lb. Without rifle sights, slugs are limited to 50 yds, max. Having to unload, boil out the gun, re oil it, every time you fire the thing, huge pita. Black powder is a curse. A slingbow and a takedown pellet rifle are far better. At least they are quiet and you can re-use arrows.
     
  7. schizm

    schizm Banned Member

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    given the 10 lb weight of a typical muzzleloader, vs the 4 lbs of a Marlin Papoose,and 1 lb o 7/8" scope, I can carry 650 rds of ammo and start with the same weight. I gain 120 rds for every lb of powder and shot he gains. and I dont have the corrosion, smoke, filth and misfire issues he has. with a see thru mount and a 2x7 scope, I can see far better than he can. I can take rabbits and squirrels at twice the range he can, using the Papoose. the better bet is the M4 with the .22lr conversion unit, tho. Ar's are now a mere $500 at Atwoods, the .22 unit is $300 at Ciener firearms. with a 30 rd box mag. The unit weighs 3/4 lb, groups 2" or better at 50 yds, strikes within 2" of 223 POI at 50m, Given the suppressor, subsonic Aquila 60 gr ammo, 1 i n 9 rifling twist, and knowing to hold shut the bolt with your off hand, the .22 sounds like a BB gun. The "can" makes the full power 223 sound like a normal .22lr rifle, inaudible at just half the distance to which you can hear a 12 ga or centerfire blast.

    the longhunter thing is bs. shtf is going to mean horrific combat for at least the first 6 months, cannibalism will be common. the livestock will all be eaten within a month, along with all the stored grain and legumes. Starving cats, dogs and people will see to that. In another month, the cats, dogs, fish, and all known-edible plants will be gone, too. The only animals on earth will be on remote islands (very remote) Being out and about during daylight hours will get you shot. Longterm will have to mean scattered, well hidden, small plots of sprouts, and later, (maybe) some root veggies, carefully blended into the woods.
     

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