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Carrying a real gun.

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Whirlibird, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    With hunting season upon us, it's always amusing to see what everyone is packing.
    First open carry is legal here year round, but the cannons that are brought out even if they aren't used.

    Granted there are bears not that far away from here, but some of these really need wheels and a crew to serve them.
    But I digress from my original intent.

    Hunting with the kids this week. Going out again this afternoon.

    So a deer was shot and dropped.

    Sent the kid back to the truck for the game bags and gear. He left his rifle because of the slope down into the valley.
    In the ten minutes it takes me to get down to the deer, it hasn't twitched.
    Pull out the .22 pistol to put an insurance shot into the skull as I'm walking up..
    @10y, the head pops up and it's gone!
    Guts hanging out and dragging.

    Start after it slowly, give it time to drop again and stiffen up.

    I stopped and waited, after losing view of the deer behind a bunch of bushes.
    When the boy arrived, I asked him where it fell, he said, right there. Literally on the other side of the next bush.

    .22 ready this time, I come around the bush, and up the head comes again. Off it goes! Pop x3 with the .22. Nothing.

    Enough of this messing around, the .22 goes back in the pocket, the CCW piece comes out.

    He's ready on his side with the rifle, we continue on, tracking the blood trail, within @50y, there it is. Head comes up, the .40 comes up also.

    From @10y, the .40 hollow point goes in one side of the neck, through the spine and out the other side. Finally done.
    A couple of .22's are added to the top of the skull, just in case this deer really is a zombie, as it has been mimicking.

    This isn't a "Dang I'm a good shot" story, but an explanation why I always carry a full power (concealed) handgun in the field.
    Concealed because of the weather, the snagging on every piece of gear, etc.
    Full power, because you never know what you may need to use it for. I can't say just how many critters I've had to finish off on roadsides over the years, used to use the backup gun so I didn't have to write a report about using department ammo.

    Field results?
    The three .22's fired from behind, one hole in the left ear, and two HP's flattened on the back of the skull.
    The .40 HP, completely destroyed the spine with a modest exit.

    So once again, I prove to myself that my habitual carrying of a light and powerful handgun that is worth the effort.
    Especially in the field.


    How about you?
     
  2. livingsurvival

    livingsurvival Administrator
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    The first time I ever hunted for deer I used a shotgun. Took down a seven pointer hitting him in the shoulder and then one more to end his suffering. I then moved to a rifle but never got a deer with it. After the first year I switched to bow hunting with a compound bow. Did this for years and never had to take a second shot as they were all placed within vitals and deer were dead upon finding them. For more of a challenge I swapped between the compound and a recurve and again never had to have a follow up shot. Once crossbows became legal from a treestand here I started using that. For the last ten years I have hunted with my crossbow only. Taken many deer and always get a vital kill shot. I did have one deer that jumped a fence and ran. While tracking we found the gut pile at the fence (must have fallen out) but the deer was still another 400+ yds. away. Tough son of a gun. I've never carried while hunting deer and never felt the need to do so. I always let the deer bed down and then track after an hour or so. Never had one still alive thankfully. If I were hunting wild boar or larger animal (elk, moose, caribou) I would probably carry my pistol as well.
     
  3. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    One problem around here, we have moose, mountain lion, wolves and bears all within walking distance.

    The moose ate the crab apples off the tree in my front yard, so that threat is normal.

    Tried the archery thing, never lost an animal but I have never liked waiting for something to die. Always preferred the closest to instant as possible.
    Gave it up after finishing off a nice buck loaded with gangrene and two arrows, still up and walking.

    In the story above, my son fired a difficult shot with a rifle he had never used, his sisters. He had somehow managed to jam his up and he grabbed hers.

    I used to carry "hunting" pistols during the season, but got to the point where changing from my concealment piece made zero sense as the handgun was and is merely a backup normally.

    And there, concealed and out of the way is extremely helpful.
     
    six likes this.
  4. six

    six Well-Known Member

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    Even the coup de grace is illegal with a .22 here in MT (and most other States. Might want to double-check your local laws before doing that again).

    Away from town, if I'm above 5000 feet, I carry a .357. If I'm below 5000 feet, I just stick with my normal carry gun, a .45acp but swap ammo to some +p loads with 255 grain hard cast flat noses. It's unusual (not impossible, just not common) to encounter brown bears below 5000. Same for moose. You'll almost never see one below 5000 feet around here.
     
  5. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    Six,
    Thanks to both poorly written and highly vague yet oddly restrictive laws here, your .45 would also not be "legal", and that .357 is questionable for hunting.

    My .40 certainly isn't. Nor is a 10mm.

    But as I wasn't hunting, my choice of 'trail guns' opens up. Technicality?
    Certainly.


    Our game warden wants to ding me for using a .22 for a CdG, I'll be happy to embarrass him in court.
    Ten years fighting shyster DUI lawyers, I'm up for a little fun and games.
     

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