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alternative food procurement

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Trapping' started by Whirlibird, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    Going to ask on this one, as I don't want to offend.


    What is the position on food gathering methods that are grey or downright illegal right now but may be of service in an emergency or post SHTF?
     
    livingsurvival likes this.
  2. six

    six Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts: Hungry is hungry. There is no greater motivators for action than hunger, thirst, or pain.

    While I appreciate game management efforts and understand why we have laws and I do obey all such laws: I do not recognize nor accept the idea of the King's Deer in the King's Forest. If I'm hungry because the world has gone off the rails and food is scarce or non-existent via normal trade, I will not hesitate to kill game or take fish out of their normal seasons or from locations the law would dictate not to.

    Your question was somewhat vague, so I'll leave it at that instead of letting my imagination run wild regarding looting, cannibalism, eating the neighbors cat, etc.
     
  3. livingsurvival

    livingsurvival Administrator
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    Agreed.
     
    mountainman likes this.
  4. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    I'll take that as a go ahead.

    Disclaimer: This is for information purposes, and if you get caught doing anything illegal, you are on your own.

    In many places in the world, you have geese and other fowl.
    Without a firearm, some birds are difficult to take at best.

    However, depending upon your location and the materials you have on hand, one can make some fairly effective traps that require minimal attention.

    First up, the bucket trap.
    The bucket trap is an easy way to utilize those extra 5 gallon buckets that we all have laying around.

    Start by gathering a tarp, a shovel, your bucket and some "bait". Corn, barley, wheat all work but sticking with what the critters are eating normally does help.

    Hopefully you have made some notes where the birds are feeding and can access these without prying eyes taking notice.

    Take your bucket and use your shovel to cut around the bucket to mark the outer diameter and start digging.
    This is where the tarp comes in handy, moving and disposing of the extra dirt.

    Once you have the hole deep enough to fully "bury" the bucket up to the rim, lightly fill in around the bucket to keep the bucket in place and eliminate any places where the bird may stick a foot and be scared away.

    I like to leave the lid on during the burying process, to keep the bucket clean inside.

    Once you have cleared up your mess, put down some bait, getting the quantity heavier around the bucket.
    Remove the lid and put some bait in the bucket.

    Either set more traps or skedaddle. Check them a couple times a day.

    In 'goose' country, the goose will walk along eating the bait and jump down into the bucket after the bait. Geese can't jump out, and can't extend their wings to fly or help themselves out of the bucket.

    Warning: Geese in the trap are generally noisy and will attract both people and predators.

    I have seen geese live trapped and relocated by simply slipping the lid on top and pulling the bucket out for transport.

    A variation on this can be found in the military survival manuals.

    In this case a trench is dug, in a thin "V" shape, getting deeper as the trench narrows.
    The trench is cut to the size of the critter, grouse, pheasant, so it can stick it's head up to look around.
    The bird walks into the trench, it narrows to a point where the bird can't turn around, raise it's wings or back up.

    As with most traps, your mileage may vary. I have seen the bucket trap work extremely well, both legally and otherwise.

    More to follow.
     
    six likes this.
  5. Whirlibird

    Whirlibird Well-Known Member

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    For those who are land locked, or have only minimal water exposure, fishing nets can still be highly productive.

    I have an old (50+ years) gill net and as a food producer, it's been one of the best.

    Strung out along game trails, one can drive rabbits into it or let them wander into it.

    Set up to one side of scattered grain, one can flush a covey of birds into one.

    Set up flat, one can scare deer onto it. This will tear up a net, fair warning.

    Put on the inside of high places, think bell tower, can catch pigeons as they come in to roost.

    Set up in a pond or river, mesh size is critical. Too large, you miss the smaller panfish. Too small, the lunkers just don't get hung up.

    This also applies to seines. Growing up in the sticks, we often grabbed the seine and went out and hit the local ponds before fishing. Two or three trips out and back per pond generally "netted" us enough for minnows for bait, more tadpoles than one can shake a stick at (which were returned), and crawdads for dinner.

    Surprisingly enough, a fish spear was an amazing tool for a couple of teens. The traditional flat "Neptune's trident" worked OK, but a round Asian style was pure murder.
    Fish, frogs, and some other critters fell to a couple of teens with more regard for going to bed hungry than some game laws. Not knowing about seasons was probably an advantage looking back.

    Bows and fishing arrows, some days were surprisingly good for fish and fowl.
    Blunts or judo points worked well in small furry critters.
    My friend had a nice compound bow,and after shooting completely through several fish and small game animals,
    After losing a number of good arrows, he quickly switched to a light recurve like me, using cheap discount store arrows.
    Those bows saw a lot of use, sending line across streams to pull nets and trot lines into position, fish from the banks and boats, small game, and something for kids to do pre-internet.

    I'm still no archer, rabbits generally ran in front of my arrows committing suicide rather than any level of skill on my part.

    For the most part, one can make any of these things as needed, but if you ever try to make a gill net let alone a seine, you will learn why purchasing these ahead of time is recommended. Highly.

    Plus right now, these items are available and inexpensive. Always something to consider.

    More to follow.
     

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